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  • The Cyclops Revenge is Scheduled for Release in 2017!
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Adverbs Can Kill Your Writing… Literally

 

In addition to my own writing, I have had the privilege and pleasure of editing several works in the past few years. Editing provides me the opportunity to educate new writers who aspire to publish quality work. It also allows me to stay sharp in my own writing. Many of my clients have excellent stories. They lack, however, the proper techniques to make their words, plots and ideas leap of the page. I see many areas where improvement is possible. In past blog posts, we have discussed dialogue, plotting and telegraphing versus foreshadowing to enhance your plots. Today, I write about one more discipline. Continue reading

Sneak a Peek: The Cyclops Revenge (Chapter 1)

Chapter 1

Friday, April 10th

Two and a half years later

Jason Rodgers was about to implement the plan to finally bury his ghosts. The carefully laid plans had been in place for weeks. Tonight marked their new beginning. The first step to making his life whole again. In the days to follow, he would put his past behind him and keep it there. He leaned back, satisfied, pleased with himself. Everything was going perfectly. Almost perfectly, anyway. The meal had been fantastic, the service exemplary. Everything had gone off without a hitch. Except, that is, for Chrissie’s demeanor. Continue reading

Writers Pay Themselves First

Time is the rarest of commodities for all of us, writers or insurance agents or jewelers or stay-at-home moms. Each day has exactly the same amount of time whether it’s measured in 24 hours or 1,440 minutes or 86,400 seconds. There is no rewind button on the remote that will take us back in time. You can’t grow or manufacture more of it. Once it’s gone, it’s gone. Continue reading

Write Dialogue That Grabs Your Reader

Deep, thought-provoking characters are one of the keys to grabbing your reader by the eyeballs causing them to postpone putting that book down. Flawed characters with life-like problems capture a reader’s empathy. Great characters make for great stories. The way they speak and communicate is the portal to their past and their soul. Continue reading

Work like a Sculptor to Create a Great Story

Creating and writing a novel is akin to being a sculptor. Sculpture is, of course, the branch of visual arts utilizing all three dimensions. There are a great many techniques and materials sculptors have used throughout the ages. The media available to sculptors is varied and unlimited. Stone, metal, ceramics, wood and a variety of others.

Writing is the creation of three-dimensional characters and life-like stories in your reader’s minds. It is mental sculpting. The writer is the artist. Continue reading

The Rewards of Becoming a Writer

What does it take to become a writer?

The obvious and simple answer is to write something. The second step is to take what you have written and get it published. That means bringing it to the masses. Put it out there for others to read, to learn from, to enjoy and possibly criticize. Continue reading

Telegraphing vs. Foreshadowing

One of the most common mistakes inexperienced writers make when they write is telegraphing. Telegraphing occurs when the author reveals what is going to happen before it actually happens. It kills the suspense you have worked so hard to create.

You have spent countless hours crafting your plot, creating hazards and traps for your protagonist and putting them in seemingly inescapable situations. Don’t let telegraphing happen to you. Continue reading

Transform Your Heroes for a Stronger Plot

Our heroes are the lifeblood of our stories. They are the engine that makes our plots run. We all rely on dependable transportation. And for that reason, most of us take care to make sure our cars and their engines are diligently cared for and free from flaws. Continue reading

A Spring Day in College Sealed My Fate

It was a bright, clear spring day in New England in 1985. I was a third year pharmacy student at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy on Longwood Avenue. The school is situated in the Fenway section of Boston directly across the street from Harvard Medical School (I mention this because I want you to think that some of that intelligence rubbed off or was in the air and I inhaled large doses of it!) and near Emerson College, the Berklee College of Music and, of course, Fenway Park. I remember it quite clearly because it was day I decided that someday I would be a writer of novels. This epiphany occurred in the school library on the second floor of the main building. Continue reading